Travel Therapists on the Road to Financial Independence (Guest Post for APTA National Student Conclave)

This year we will be presenting at the American Physical Therapy Association’s (APTA) National Student Conclave (NSC), October 31-November 1 in Albuquerque, NM.

NSC is a conference for physical therapy students across the country, filled with educational sessions, networking opportunities, and fun activities too!

During our presentation, we will be educating future Doctors of Physical Therapy (DPTs) and Physical Therapist’s Assistants (PTAs) on the ins and outs of travel therapy, as well as how pursuing travel therapy can help set them up for future financial success.

Below is an article we wrote for the APTA blog “The Pulse” as a preview to our session at NSC. You can see the original post here on the APTA Website.


Have you ever wanted to travel the country and get paid to do it? Us too.

Luckily with travel physical therapy, this dream can be a reality.

Discovering travel therapy during our first year of physical therapy school changed our whole life and career trajectory. At first, it seemed like an exciting and prudent thing to do for a few years. We would try out a few different settings, explore the United States (US), and save up enough money to pay off our loans. Then, we would move back home and settle down, starting permanent jobs only a few years after graduation.

But then we had a better idea. Why stop traveling when we truly love the lifestyle it’s allowed us to create?

It’s been over 4 years since we started our journey as travel physical therapists (PTs), and we don’t intend to stop anytime soon.

We’ve been able to create a lifestyle of flexibility that allows us to work in a variety of settings and states, while earning a high income (sometimes twice as much as the permanent PTs working in the same facilities), and taking off as much time as we want and can afford due to our moderate lifestyle to travel both domestically and internationally, as well as spend time at home with our families. We’ve taken full advantage of this flexibility thus far and have no regrets!

Since becoming PTs in 2015, we’ve had some amazing adventures inside and outside the clinic.

We’ve been able to travel to over half of the 50 states, with that number growing even more later this year with a couple of road trips, as well as over 30 countries—for fun, not for work.

We’ve grown professionally and personally by working in several different clinics across the US and meeting some amazing people along the way. This includes trying multiple settings in order to find where our passion, as PTs, truly lies.

And to top it off, we’ve been able to set ourselves up for financial success by contributing heavily toward retirement and investment accounts early in our careers. Many of the PTs we’ve communicated with over the years seem to really struggle with this.

Are you interested in having your cake and eating it too, even if it’s just for 13 weeks or a couple of years? Do you want to learn how you can have amazing adventures, earn higher income, meet new people, pay off your student loans more quickly, explore the country (maybe even the world), all while honing your skills and experiences as a PT?

Then we encourage you to join us this year at the American Physical Therapy Association’s National Student Conclave in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to learn more about the world of travel therapy and how it can help you achieve your personal, professional, and financial goals after graduation!

In the meantime, you can browse our social media pages to see some of our adventures around the world, including our recent 15-week trip to Europe and our 2-week road trip across the US!

Join us October 31 – November 2, 2019 at APTA’s National Student Conclave — the only conference for students, by students. For the best rates register by September 25, 2019.

Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC, and Jared Casazza, PT, DPT, run the website TravelTherapyMentor.com. Connect with them on their blogInstagram, and Facebook.

The Single Biggest Advantage of Travel Therapy

Written by: Jared Casazza, PT, DPT


In the past I’ve written several articles on the financial advantages of being a travel therapist and how those advantages have allowed Whitney and me to embark on an alternative lifestyle full of international travel. In fact, I’ve always made it known that the financial aspects of being a travel therapist are the biggest reasons I was so dead set on going down the path of travel therapy even two years prior to graduation. However, there is one even bigger advantage that I’ve been thinking a lot about lately that is even more important to me than making more money… and that is flexibility.

The Many Faces of Flexibility

Flexibility as a travel therapist comes in many forms. There’s the flexibility to take extended periods of time off.

  • I’m currently writing this after last working over 6 months ago.

There’s the flexibility to try out different settings for a three month stint to see if you have any interest in that area.

  • I’ve now worked in outpatient ortho, acute care, home health, skilled nursing, and wound care while traveling.

There’s the flexibility to choose to invest money instead of paying down student debt.

  • This is primarily due to travel therapists having lower taxable income meaning a lower monthly income based payment due each month. And this is the path I’ve chosen for my own finances.

There’s even the flexibility to decide if pay or travel location is more important to you for the next three months and to change your mind about that decision after each assignment.

  • Occasionally these two coincide, but generally higher paying contracts are in less desirable areas.

Flexible Time Off

Starting out traveling as a new grad, I was most concerned about making as much money as possible to offset my student loan debt (and in my case, start investing heavily early in my career). For that reason, pay was the primary consideration for me, but I’ve recently found that the flexibility to take time off is even more important. These things go hand in hand to some degree, because without making so much more money as a traveler, it would be difficult to take extended time off of work, but the flexibility goes beyond that.

If I had taken a permanent job out of school, there’s little doubt it my mind that I also would have saved a large percentage of my income despite the lower total pay at a permanent job. After a couple of years, I would have likely had enough saved to take an extended trip out of the country, but because of the nature of a permanent position this would have been impossible. After all, it’s difficult to find a permanent employer in healthcare that is willing to let an employee take two consecutive weeks off, much less 5 months! So to me, the flexibility in time off allowed by travel therapy is huge.

Flexibility to Try New Settings

The flexibility to try out different settings is something that I didn’t know at first would be a benefit of traveling. I was always most interested in outpatient ortho as a student and undoubtedly would have taken a permanent job in this area had I not decided to travel. Whitney with her Athletic Training background was 100% in agreement with me in this area. To my surprise, after taking a couple of contracts in other areas, I found that I actually really enjoy home health and even wound care!

As a student, wound care was something that I was terrified of, and I would have never willingly taken a job with that requirement if it wasn’t for knowing it was only for three months. Home health is an area that I started to become interested in, but I most likely wouldn’t have taken the leap into trying it out at a permanent job due to fear of the unknown. As a traveler, it is much easier to get over that fear when you have a predetermined end date that you know will be there pretty quickly if it turns out you really don’t like the job (this was skilled nursing for me).

Flexibility to Invest Instead of Paying Down Debt

I’m not sure if investing instead of paying off my debt is something that I would have done if I had taken a permanent job, but there’s no doubt that it’s more feasible as a travel therapist. The biggest reason is that with a lower taxable pay as a travel therapist comes a lower income based student loan payment. Ordinarily, this wouldn’t be a big deal, but when using the REPAYE income based repayment plan, this becomes more important.

The reason is that under REPAYE, half of the accumulated interest each month is subsidized, which ends up being a massive benefit for travel therapists who choose an income driven repayment plan. For me, this is the difference between having an effective interest rate of 6% on my loans versus an effective interest rate of 3.2%. Or, to put this in different terms, it’s the difference between my student debt growing at $500/month versus growing at $266/month.

If you take into account that the stock market returns on average 7-10%, then you can see why investing your money to get that return instead of paying off low interest debt at 3% would make sense. Having the interest accumulate much more slowly makes investing instead of paying down my student debt a no-brainer in my current situation.

Flexibility to Choose Between Pay and Location

Since the primary motivator of travel therapy for Whitney and me was pay, to this point we’ve always chosen to take higher paying travel contracts in rural areas. In addition to the higher pay, we like the slower pace, caring people, and lower cost of living that goes along with traveling to rural areas. Although rural areas are great for us, they lack the excitement of being closer to bigger cities and more desirable areas.

In the future, as money becomes less and less of a motivating factor for us as we approach financial independence, location is likely going to become more important. For example, we’ll likely sacrifice pay and low cost of living at some point to take travel assignments in Hawaii and southern California, which is something that we would never have done three years ago when starting out.

Take Home Points

It’s inevitable that priorities change throughout one’s life. The many different forms of flexibility offered by travel therapy have made pursuing these changes in desires and priorities much more feasible for Whitney and me. Starting out, we never would have guessed that some day we would value being able to take 5 months off to travel around the world, being able to experiment with different settings, or being able to try out the city life without committing to it long term. Travel therapy has given us the ability to do all of the above due to the flexibility, and that has been priceless!

 

jared doctor of physical therapy

Author: Jared Casazza, PT, DPT – Traveling Doctor of Physical Therapy – Aggressively seeking Financial Independence early in his career

Is Contributing to a Company 401k Worth it as a Travel Therapist?

Written by: Jared Casazza, PT, DPT

What Makes Travel Therapy Different?

Travel therapists are in a unique position with respect to 401k accounts. When working with most travel healthcare companies, therapists will be eligible to contribute to the company sponsored 401k plan. The 401k benefit eligibility will vary company to company, but most companies provide it in some form. However, since many travelers switch between travel companies pretty frequently, it is a common concern whether contributing to the company 401k plan makes sense for them, or if it would just be additional hassle. Unsurprisingly, since most of my articles on FifthWheelPT are finance related, this is definitely one of the top five most common questions I get asked by current and prospective travelers. In addition to wanting to know if using the 401k plan is worth the hassle if switching between companies, I often hear that there is concern about what happens with account once the individual leaves the company or stops contributing to the account.

I hope to shed some light on my thoughts about 401k plans for travelers in this post, but I do not intend this to be specific advice for any of you. This is just what I’ve done and what works for me, but everyone’s situation is different, so be sure to do your own research on the topic as well.

What is a 401k?

First let’s cover the basics of what a traditional 401k plan is and why one would choose to contribute to it in the first place. Most travel companies don’t offer a Roth 401k option, so we can skip over that for now, but if you’re interested in my thoughts on Roth vs. Traditional accounts, you can check that out here.

A traditional 401k is a retirement account that is offered by an employer and allows the employee to contribute pre-tax money to the account from each pay check. The amount contributed is up to the employee, but it is usually based on a percentage of the employee’s taxable income. Since the money isn’t taxed when it’s contributed, it’s able to grow in the account tax free for however long it remains in the account. When withdrawals are made (usually in retirement), the money withdrawn each year is then taxed along with any other earnings (social security, investment income, rental income, etc.). The big benefit of this account is that it allows you to contribute money while working and earning a lot, therefore in a higher tax bracket, and instead paying taxes on the money in retirement while (hopefully) in a lower tax bracket. The money also grows more quickly in a 401k than in a regular investment (brokerage) account since the amount that would have been taxed is compounded. The maximum that an individual is able to contribute to a 401k in 2018 is $18,500, and for 2019 it will be $19,000. Taking advantage of the tax benefits of a traditional 401k (and additionally, a traditional IRA) is a huge part of what has allowed me to semi-retire and travel around this world this year after only three years of full time work as a travel therapist.

401k Employer Match

A 401k sometimes has the added benefit of employer matching. The amount that is matched, if any at all, is determined by the employer and will usually be somewhere between 3%-6% of the employee’s taxable income. The employer can also include a contingency that it is only matched if the employee contributes a certain amount as well. This is the employer’s way of helping the employee have a more secure retirement by contributing to their retirement account. In many companies, the employer match took the place of a pension that used to be standard but has now disappeared in most public sector jobs. An employer match is in no way equal to a pension since the benefit is comparatively small, but any extra money toward retirement is a great thing!

The employer match is great if the company offers one, but for the majority of travelers this will be a moot point. Most travel companies offer a 401k with some sort of employer match, BUT they have a vesting schedule. The vesting schedule determines how much of the employer match you get to keep if you leave the company early, which makes this an incentive for the employee to stay with that employer. Many of the companies require that you have to work between 3-5 years with the company to keep all of the employer match. Some plans will have a tiered vesting schedule: something along the lines of at one year you keep 20% of the matched amount, at two years you keep 40%, etc. However others have a “cliff” vesting schedule: something like if you work three years or more you keep all of the matched amount, but if you leave before three years you don’t keep any of the amount that has been matched. Basically, the 401k employer match is great, but unfortunately it won’t apply to travelers that switch between companies often or that don’t plan to work three years or more as a traveler. In that case, an individual retirement account could make more sense and involve less hassle for the traveler.

Traditional Individual Retirement Account

A traditional IRA (Individual Retirement Account) is another option which has the same benefits as a traditional 401k, and doesn’t require an employer to utilize, and one other big difference, the contribution maximum. A traditional IRA allows a maximum contribution of only $5,500 for 2018 and $6,000 for 2019. If you’re a big saver like me and plan to reach financial independence as quickly as possible and maybe even retire early, then that’s a relatively small maximum each year.

If you plan to switch companies often, and therefore won’t benefit from the employer match, and don’t plan on putting $6,000 or more toward your retirement account each year, then foregoing the 401k and choosing an IRA instead could be the best choice. An IRA does have the added benefit of more flexibility between investment choices. With a 401k, the investment choices are usually limited to 10-20 options chosen by the company, whereas with an IRA the investment options are essentially limitless.

Utilizing a 401k and an IRA

For those, like me, that plan to put more than $6,000 toward retirement each year, then contributing to a 401k account in addition to an IRA will likely be necessary even if the individual won’t benefit from the employer match.

Luckily, having a 401k and an IRA is pretty easy, even if you switch travel companies often. (Keep reading below to learn more about that process if switching companies.) I’ve switched between companies on a few different occasions and have always taken advantage of a 401k account if offered, while also contributing the maximum amount to both the 401k and an IRA.

There are income limits where the benefit of an IRA (the tax savings) starts to diminish if the individual is also contributing to a 401k, but the limit is higher than most traveler therapists will make at $63,000 of adjusted gross income (tax free stipends are not factored into this number).

In my opinion, if you plan to save more than $6,000 toward retirement each year, then it makes the most sense to me to contribute the maximum to an IRA, and then any additional money you wish to save would be invested in the 401k. This is assuming that you wouldn’t benefit from the employer match, but if you would, then it would be foolish to pass up that match.

Here is the general order of operations that I have used and that I think makes the most sense:

  1. 401k contributions up to the amount to get the full employer match (if applicable)
  2. IRA contributions up to the maximum ($6,000 for 2019)
  3. 401k contributions up to the maximum ($19,000 for 2019)
  4. After tax investments (brokerage account, real estate, etc.)

If your company doesn’t offer an employer match on the 401k or if you won’t be able to benefit from it due to the vesting schedule of the company, then skip #1.

What Happens to the Money and 401k Account When Switching Companies?

Let’s say that you follow the order of operations above and stay with the same company for your first year as a travel therapist, but then get a better offer from a different company and decide to switch. You knew that you would probably be changing companies eventually, either for a better paying job or a job that your company may not have, so you assumed you wouldn’t benefit from the employer match. You maxed out your traditional IRA and contributed an extra $10,000 to your 401k. Great job!

Now, since the IRA isn’t associated with the employer, it isn’t affected at all by switching companies. That account belongs to you only. But the 401k is affected by switching companies, so you’ve got a decision to make.

Here are your options:

  1. You can have the money paid out to you.
    • This is almost never a good idea since you will not only pay taxes on the money, but also penalties!
  2. You can keep the money in the 401k account of the employer
    • This will occasionally involve additional fees since you no longer work for them.
  3. You can roll the 401k over from your previous employer’s 401k account to your new employer’s 401k account.
    • This could also be a hassle if you don’t plan to stay with the next company very long.
  4. You can roll over the 401k into your already existing traditional IRA account.
    • In most cases, and what I’ve always chosen to do. It makes sense to roll the 401k balance over into your traditional IRA. This gives you the increased flexibility with investment options mentioned above, which usually means lower fees on the investments as well which is a wonderful thing. The account is also yours and not associated with any employer, so you don’t have to worry about moving it around again at a later time. And the accounts work the same way with taxes, and you won’t have to pay penalties.

401k Rollover to Traditional IRA

By rolling the money over into your traditional IRA account, you have essentially contributed the full $16,000 (investment in the IRA to the maximum plus the investment in the prior 401k plan that is now rolled over) to your traditional IRA. This is an easy way to effectively contribute more than the maximum amount to an IRA when switching companies. This simplifies your finances (less accounts to keep track of) and gives you more investment options which are both great things. The rollover process is very simple and can be repeated every time you leave an employer and have a 401k balance with them. I have rolled my 401k balance into a traditional IRA several times and it has never taken more than 30 minutes.

For those travel therapists that are saving a significant amount toward retirement each year, I think that this is the best option with all things considered. I max out my IRA, contribute as much as possible to my 401k, and then roll the 401k into the IRA each time I leave a travel company to give myself the most investment options and to keep my financial life as simple as possible, while still contributing over $20,000/year to the accounts that wouldn’t be possible with a traditional IRA alone.

If you do this as well then you’ll want to make sure that it is a direct rollover. More information on the different types of rollover can be found here.

Conclusion

I know that for those of you that aren’t very familiar with saving and investing, this can all sound intimidating, but it really isn’t very difficult and takes minimal time to figure out and implement.

For those travel therapists that don’t plan to save more than $6,000 toward retirement each year, then just foregoing the 401k and choosing an IRA instead is the most simple option. For those that want to save more than $6,000 per year and also switch companies often, it’s worth the extra effort to contribute to the company’s 401k plan once you’ve maxed out your IRA for the year and roll that 401k over each time you leave a company. Once you’ve done it once it’s a piece of cake and will take you no time.

Above all else, make sure that you’re saving for retirement in some capacity no matter what account(s) you choose to utilize!

Remember to do your own due diligence before implementing anything that I talk about, since this is not intended to be specific advice for you. Thanks for reading and I hope that this post helped to clarify things for you.

If you have any questions about this post or anything else travel therapy related then contact us and we’ll do our best to help you out. If you need assistance finding a good travel therapy company or recruiter then reach out to us and we can help you there as well.

How do you currently handle your retirement accounts as a travel therapist? Let us know in the comments!

 

Paying $0 in Federal Taxes and $0 in Student Loans Payments as a Travel Therapist

Written by: Jared Casazza, PT, DPT

Managing student loans as a new grad therapist, or even as a seasoned clinician, is one of the most common concerns that I’ve heard over the last few years. In addition, paying down student loans is also the most common reason that I’ve encountered for why new travelers choose to take travel contracts. Some of my most popular articles of all time on FifthWheelPT have to do with how I’ve chosen to manage my student loans, and this was also the topic of a recent post on this site, Travel Therapy: Paying Off Student Debt… or Not?

Today I want to talk about how it’s possible to pay $0 in federal taxes while also having a $0/month student loan payment while on an income driven repayment plan as a travel therapist. I will ignore state taxes, since this will differ for each individual based on the state in which they work and the state in which they have their tax home. I will also ignore FICA taxes since they are owed every dollar of income earned regardless of income level.

Some of the terminology and ideas in this post may get complex, so if you’re confused, check out the post linked above on Student Loans, as well as some of the links contained in that post for more background info.

Before I start, I do want to say that this is not meant to be personal advice for your individual situation, as I am not a financial advisor or accountant and have no formal training on these topics. This is information that I’ve learned from reading and researching over the past few years and implemented in my own situation, but everyone’s situation is different and tax laws change regularly. If you’re interested in doing anything similar, then do your own research or reach out to a licensed professional for help, as this post is meant for illustration and entertainment purposes only!

Alright, now with that disclaimer out of the way, let’s look at how I would plan to keep my federal taxes and student loan payments both at $0 for the foreseeable future as a full time travel therapist!

Example Situation Information

Let’s say that I’m a 26 year old new grad traveler, single tax filer, without any kids or dependents. I’m a DPT who’s home state and tax home is in Virginia. My primary goal as a travel therapist is to earn and save as much money as possible in order to increase my net worth as quickly as possible, to get to a point where I can transition into either part time work in a single location or taking fewer travel contracts each year to have more free time for family, other hobbies, or leisure travel. To do this, I invest heavily in tax deferred retirement accounts to decrease my tax burden and my student loan payment, which both allow me to save even more for the future. I have student loans of $100,000 with an average interest rate of 6%. After reading more about the various income driven repayment plans, I’ve decided that REPAYE will make the most sense for me financially, and that I plan to eventually qualify for student loan forgiveness. I also understand that half of my accumulated interest is subsidized each month while on the REPAYE plan, so the lower my monthly payment (ideally $0), the lower my effective interest rate will be!

Income, Taxes, and Student Loan Payment

As a traveler, I work about 48 weeks per year while spending a month at home each year as a vacation and to spend time with family and friends. My taxable pay on contract is $21/hour, with tax free stipends received for lodging, meals, and incidentals while on assignment traveling. In this situation, assuming I work 40 hours each week, my yearly taxable pay would equal $40,320. (21 x 40 x 48 = 40,320) The 40 hours a week is a safe assumption since I always make sure to have a 40 hour guarantee in my travel contracts (as we recommend that other travelers do)!

If I were to not try to optimize this situation at all, I would have a federal tax bill of approximately $3,208 for the tax year of 2018. I would also have a monthly student loan payment of $184, which is equal to $2,208 for the year. That’s definitely not bad but I want to do better. I’d rather keep that $5,416 in my own retirement accounts to grow and improve my net worth! Below are pictures of both the taxes and the student loan payment for this scenario. The student loan table was generated using the federal student loan website’s repayment estimator and the tax chart was generated using SmartAsset.com.

student loan repayment initial.png

income taxes initial.png

Optimized Scenario

The key to paying less in taxes and having a lower monthly income driven student loan payments lies in reducing your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). One of the easiest ways to do this is to contribute to tax deferred accounts such as a traditional 401k, a traditional IRA, or a Health Savings Account (HSA). These accounts are very advantageous because not only do they reduce your tax liability, they also benefit you in the future through the money growing in the accounts over time (provided the money is invested wisely). For my purposes, I want my AGI to be low enough that I don’t owe anything in federal taxes and I have a student loan payment of $0. However, the two numbers to achieve these goals are unlikely to be the same, so this takes some research on my part.

In 2018, the standard deduction is $12,000, which means that any income up to that amount is taxed at 0%. but you can actually go higher than this amount before owing any money in federal taxes. In my situation in this optimized scenario, by contributing to retirement accounts, I also qualify for the saver’s credit. This means that as long as I contribute at least $2,000 to a retirement account and have an AGI below $19,250. I get a $1,000 tax credit that will completely wipe out any federal taxes owed at that income level. As far as federal taxes for a single traveler without kids who contributes at least $2,000 to retirement accounts are concerned, $19,250 is the sweet spot to owe nothing. This is assuming that no other deductions or credits are available to be claimed, which in the scenario above would be true.

To have a student loan payment of $0, $19,250 is a little too high and will still lead to me having a $10/month payment. That definitely isn’t bad at all, but I can do better while only contributing a little more to the tax deferred accounts mentioned above. After playing around with the repayment estimator, I find that to have a $0 student loan payment on the REPAYE plan, the highest AGI that I can have is $18,809.

student loan repayment $0

This means that if I’m able to reduce my AGI from $40,320 down to exactly $18,809, I will achieve my goal of paying $0 in federal income taxes while also having a $0 student loan payment!

Implementation

Reducing your AGI by almost $22,000 may sound difficult, or even crazy. For most people who make only $40,000/year, that would probably be the case. However, travelers are different.

Since we receive tax free stipends which usually cover most, if not all, of our living expenses, living on a taxable income of $18,809/year isn’t nearly as hard. In fact, my girlfriend Whitney and I have each lived on much less than this each year since we began traveling, and we have met and mentored dozens if not hundreds of others that do as well. If you live an expensive lifestyle in a high cost of living area, then this might not be possible for you. But if your primary goal is to keep as much of your money as possible, while saving and investing for the future by living a modest lifestyle to achieve financial independence as quickly as possible, then this is 100% doable!

Implementing this strategy is fairly straight forward. Utilizing the tax deferred accounts mentioned above, I would need to contribute $21,511 to reach the $18,809 AGI amount talked about above. Here’s the course of action that I would take:

Since an HSA is an extremely valuable account to save for future medical expenses, or even to use as an extra retirement account, that is the first account that I would want to contribute to. I choose to utilize a high deductible health insurance plan through my travel company specifically to have access to this amazing account! The contribution limit for a HSA for a single individual is $3,450 for 2018. So I would contribute the full $3,450. ($21,511 – $3,450 = $18,061 still to contribute).

The next $5,500 (the contribution limit for IRAs in 2018) would go into a traditional IRA account. I prefer maxing out an IRA before a 401k due to the increased number of investment options available in the IRA compared to a 401k. Having more options for where to put the money will ultimately mean lower fees paid and more money in retirement. ($18,061 – $5,500 = $12,561 still to contribute).

At this point, I would have $12,561 left that I would put into the 401k plan offered by my travel company. I refuse to work with any travel company that doesn’t offer a 401k because of how valuable I find being able to contribute to these tax deferred accounts to be. A 401k has the largest limit of the accounts talked about above at $18,500 for 2018. I wouldn’t even need to max out the 401k completely since contributing just the $12,561 would get me to my goal, but if my income happened to be higher for some reason (possibly working overtime on a contract, or having other sources of income) then there would still be some wiggle room to contribute more and still achieve the magic AGI amount of $18,809.

Conclusion

As a traveler, it’s possible to have both a $0 federal tax bill and simultaneously have a $0 income driven student loan payment. Subsequently, this will allow the traveler to utilize the money saved to invest for the future and possibly achieve financial independence more quickly.

The key to achieving this is the traveler reducing his/her AGI by contributing to tax deferred accounts (401, traditional IRA, HSA). The magic AGI needed in the scenario above to reach this goal is $18,809, with anything below that amount being unnecessary. In the scenario above, using this strategy and putting the $21,511 needed into the tax deferred accounts would save the individual $5,416 between federal taxes and student loan payments, which is a 25% savings on the amount put into the accounts in the year contributed! Instead of that money being paid to the federal government and the student loan servicer, it would be invested and subsequently compounding tax-deferred over the years.

Being able to do this is relatively unique to travelers, since many of our expenses are reimbursed tax free while traveling, making living on the much lower AGI completely feasible; whereas, someone without the tax free stipends may struggle. Whitney, Travis, and I here at Travel Therapy Mentor have all taken advantage of tax deferred accounts to reduce our tax burdens while traveling, which we believe is a smart way to not only save money on taxes but also to set yourself up for a financially comfortable future!

Thanks for reading and making it through all of that! Do you take advantage of tax deferred accounts to reduce your income taxes and student loan payment while traveling? Let us know in the comments below! Reach out to us with any questions or for clarification on anything mentioned above. If you’re getting started with travel therapy and you need help finding a good recruiter/travel company, then send us a message to get our recommendations!

Why Choose Travel Therapy?

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT

My “Why” For Travel Therapy

Everyone’s “why” will be very personal and may be very different. My fiancée Julia and I are traveling for the freedom it provides. We enjoy not being tied down to one geographic location and not being obligated to work 50 weeks per year. There are too many things we want to do with our lives to settle down in a permanent position.

We want to travel, not for 2 weeks each year, but long enough to immerse ourselves in the culture of a new place. We would someday like to do international mission trips as well where we can use our skills and training to help others that have tougher challenges and decreased access to appropriate healthcare.

What’s Your “Why”?

You don’t have to want the same things I want, but you should know your why. Maybe it’s to travel, maybe it’s to pay student loans off, maybe it’s for financial independence. It could be that you completed 3-4 internships and have no idea what setting you want to practice in because your profession has too many awesome options (I can relate to this)! Maybe you’re burnt out in your current position and need a change of scenery.

Whatever your why is, you hopefully take it into consideration before embarking on a traveling or permanent career decision.  Your why can, and hopefully will, change as you grow as a person, but your why can always provide you with direction in your career and life.

So, what is your “why” for considering travel therapy? Shoot us a message or leave a comment below. We’d be happy to help you get started on your journey to pursuing travel therapy today.

Travel Therapy: What is a “Tax Home”?

Authors: Travis Kemper, PT, DPT; Jared Casazza, PT, DPT; Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC

What is a Tax Home?

If you are just starting out in travel therapy you may not be familiar with the concept of a “tax home.”  Basically, a tax home is your primary residence, where you live and/or work. When you’re working as a travel therapist, having a tax home allows you to take housing and per diem stipends provided by travel therapy companies without having to pay taxes on them due to the stipends being a reimbursement for costs incurred at the travel assignment location.

This is a major benefit for you and greatly increases your potential total compensation, if housing costs are kept at a reasonable amount, when compared to a permanent job, where all your income is taxed. This is the main reason why “take-home” pay (otherwise known as your after-tax pay, the money that actually goes into your bank account) as a traveler is higher than pay in permanent jobs.

But, maintaining a proper tax home is a little more complicated than just saying you “have” a permanent residence.

The Basics of Maintaining a Tax Home

To be allowed to take the untaxed stipends, per IRS guidelines, you need to be able to demonstrate at least two of the following three criteria:

  1. You must maintain a place of permanent residence and pay expenses there (i.e. rent, own/mortgage, pay bills, pay taxes, etc.) while ALSO paying expenses at your travel location. This is called “duplicating expenses.”
  2. You must not abandon your tax home. Generally speaking, you should return there at least 30 days per year but these days don’t have to be consecutive.
  3. You must still conduct business in the area of your tax home. For example, you have a PRN job there or maintain some type of other business there.

The third criteria is a little vague, as some interpret “conducting business” as having bank accounts and credit cards, car registration and insurance, and voter registration associated with the tax home, not specifically working in the area.

Without meeting at least 2/3 of these requirements, you would be considered an “itinerant worker,” and all of your income will be taxed.

There is nothing wrong with having all of your income taxed, and you may still come out ahead this way as compared with a regular, permanent job. But, we like to keep as much of our money as possible, so qualifying for the tax free stipends is ideal provided that maintaining your tax home isn’t so expensive that it negates the benefit.

To find out more about tax homes and all things about travel taxes, we recommend you check out the website TravelTax.com/traveler.html. (Specifically, scroll down to the section “how to keep a tax home”). This is a wonderful website where we have all learned a significant amount over the years.

What Are Some Strategies to Keeping a Tax Home?

Of course if you already own a home/have a mortgage, or rent an apartment, these can be maintained as your tax home. But this method can be more costly and also more complicated since you may not have someone to look after your place while you’re away. You may be thinking you could rent out your house while you are gone, but this is not advisable unless you specifically state in the lease agreement that you would maintain at least one room in the house as your own and you stay in that room while in the area (at least 30 days per year as mentioned above).

Perhaps a better option is renting a room out from your parents or a friend, which in our opinion is great way to maintain your tax home. Go on Craigslist, see what a comparable room rents for, and pay your family/friend to rent the room in their house. It’s also recommended that you have a contract written and signed. They will have to claim it as income on their tax returns, but they can keep the extra income to help around the home. That is the simplest way, and that is what we have been doing since starting to travel. As mentioned by Joseph Smith at Travel Tax, you ideally would also want to work in this new area for a while before traveling in order to solidify this new area as your tax home.

A more unique strategy that Julia and I are considering doing next year is house hacking for our tax home. House hacking is simply performed by purchasing a multi-unit home (duplex, triplex, quadplex), and renting out the other units, while you live in one unit.  Your tenants can effectively pay your rent and pay down your mortgage at the same time, enabling you to live for free or dramatically reducing your housing costs. You can find more information on house hacking here.

Do you have a different creative way of keeping a tax home? Do you have questions about tax homes? Send us a message and we can chat!

Travel Therapy: An Alternative Lifestyle

Written by: Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC

An Amazing Adventure

If you had told me in 2015 when I graduated from physical therapy school that at 3 years into my career I would be working only 6 months out of the year, taking a 5 month long trip around the world, with a couple weeks off at home, while barely touching my savings, I certainly would not have believed you! But here I am, doing just that. And I think my life will look a lot like that for the next few years, not just this year.

Making the choice to pursue traveling physical therapy has been life changing for me. And I’m not alone. Many therapists and other healthcare professionals have tapped into this role and aren’t looking back!

How Is This Possible?

Many know that as a traveling therapist, you make more money. How you choose to spend this extra money can dramatically change your lifestyle.

Personally, my boyfriend Jared and I have chosen to live frugally, and for 3 years we worked back to back to back contracts only on the East Coast of the US, minimizing unpaid time off. We have been saving up to take this amazing 5-month trip to over 10 countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. Between the additional income we’ve been able to earn as traveling physical therapists, making early investments to produce passive income, as well as utilizing credit card rewards and other travel hacks, we have been able to take this trip with only a small impact on our total net worth.

Other travel therapists choose to take time off between contracts to take shorter trips, perhaps a week or so to explore part of the US while they travel from one contract to the next, or a couple weeks here and there to take trips out of the country. This is also a great option and is all possible with the flexibility and extra income that travel therapy provides.

An Alternative Lifestyle

By choosing to be travel therapists and go out of the country for half the year, we have perhaps “given up” some other things that many of our friends at home have, such as having a house, having kids or pets, or being in close proximity to family. We hope to enjoy those parts of life at a later time, but for now we are so happy with the flexibility and endless adventures that our lifestyle choice has afforded us!

Plus, no two travel therapists are alike. We know travel therapists with homes, and children, and pets, who get to see quite a bit of their family. The best part about being a travel therapist is lifestyle flexibility!

The Bottom Line

If you’ve been considering pursuing travel therapy, all I can say is give it a try! The best part about travel therapy is you can do just one 13-week contract and not be tied down to being a traveler forever. If you try it and it doesn’t work out for you, then you can always take, or return to, a permanent position. But, you may just find that an alternative lifestyle is right for you too. It’s been the best choice of our lives, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything!

Travel therapy may not be for everyone, but if you can make it work for you, it can open the door to financial freedom and unlimited adventure!

If you have questions about starting your travel therapy journey, please reach out to us and we’d be happy to help get you started!