Finding Short Term Housing vs. Living in an RV as a Traveling Healthcare Provider

*This is a Guest Post that Whitney wrote for Furnished Finder where she discusses the differences in housing options for travel therapists, including some of the pros and cons of each! This post should be helpful to those of you trying to decide what’s the best housing choice for you as a travel healthcare provider!


Finding Short Term Housing vs. Living in an RV as a Traveling Healthcare Provider

One of the major concerns for many healthcare providers looking to pursue travel careers is how they will set up housing. There are many housing options out there for those of us who travel for work, from using sites like Furnished Finder to secure short-term furnished housing, to having the travel agency set you up at an extended stay hotel, to choosing some form of tiny living on wheels like an RV!

During my 5 years as a traveling physical therapist, I have utilized a few of these housing options and have had the opportunity to weigh the pros and cons of each. (And let me tell you, any option is going to have pros and cons!)

So let’s dive in to some of those pros and cons to considering these different options for housing, and maybe some of my insight will help you along your own travel healthcare journey!

Logistics and Considerations

When you’re considering what option to choose for housing, you will first need to take into account your own personal situation. Are you traveling solo, with a significant other, with children, or with a pet? Do you feel comfortable sharing accommodations or would you rather have your own place? If you’re thinking about tiny living/RVing, do you feel comfortable with the maintenance and upkeep involved with owning a home on wheels, plus towing it around the country?

In addition, you need to consider the location of your potential travel contract(s). Are you interested in traveling to big cities or more rural places? Some quick internet searches can reveal a lot for you as to how easy or difficult it’s going to be to secure short term housing on your own vs. having the travel company assist you with the process. It will also give you an idea of whether finding campgrounds/RV parks in the vicinity of where you might travel will be feasible.

For me, I am a traveling physical therapist and travel with my significant other who is also a traveling physical therapist, so after weighing lots of options, we decided to buy a camper and lived in it for about 3 years! This worked well for us overall as a pair, rather than finding short term housing for the both of us; however, we did end up renting a short term furnished place on a couple of assignments. More on our journey below and how we chose between short term housing and the RV life!

Company Provided Housing

This is actually the only housing option I have not utilized. Generally speaking, it seems that most travel healthcare providers choose to accept the housing stipend from the travel agency and then set up their own housing, rather than letting the company handle housing. There are some travelers who choose to let the company set up housing for them though.

I think generally the best time to let the travel company set up housing for you is if in the area where you’re traveling, you are having a lot of difficulty finding housing on your own, or you are short on time to be able to set this up yourself. Also, some travelers may just find it easier to have this weight lifted off their shoulders and let the company handle it.

The pros of letting the company set up housing for you would be that you have less worry and headache in getting the housing set up. You also probably won’t be on the hook for any rent/lease issues, in case your contract gets cancelled early. However, the cons are that, you may have less control over your accommodations, and you may end up losing money on your weekly pay because they take out a lot for housing instead of giving you the housing stipend!

Finding Short Term Housing On Your Own

I would say this is the option that the majority of travel healthcare providers choose! In your pay package, you will have the company allocate part of your pay as a housing stipend (hopefully tax free if you qualify by maintaining your tax home– hooray!). Then you will utilize different websites, like Furnished Finder; ask around in online forums and groups; call realtors and apartment complexes; and so forth until you can identify some good short term housing options!

The pros here are that you can usually find housing that’s cheaper than what the travel therapy company would take out of your paycheck, so after you pay your rent, you should come out ahead by keeping the extra money! (Who doesn’t like extra money?!) You also have more control over choosing your accommodations, such as proximity to work/attractions, as well as how many bedrooms/bathrooms, and other amenities at the accommodation!

Cons are that it is sometimes difficult to find places that offer short term rentals near where you’re going to be working. I’ve definitely run into this in the times that I had to search for short term housing. A lot of apartment complexes and personal ads for housing do not allow any shorter than 12 month leases. Also, lots of the places you find won’t be furnished or have utilities included, which leaves you with another problem to solve.

I will say that Furnished Finder has solved a lot of these problems for us. They only list places that offer short term leases (or even better, month to month!) for us as healthcare travelers. And all of their listings are already furnished. I can’t stress how much hassle this removes in terms of setting up leases, getting stuck in leases if your contract is cancelled, setting up utilities, and furnishing a place for only a couple months!

But, unfortunately there is never a guarantee that a property on Furnished Finder will be available for the location and dates that you need, so alas we must sometimes use the other options like Craigslist, Airbnb, VRBO, apartment complexes, extended stay motels, realtors, etc!

In my experience, I’ve rented two different places I found off Craigslist for two different assignments. Both were semi-private, meaning that they were part of someone’s home, but we had our own “suite” if you will. One was an over-the-garage studio apartment, but we had to share the kitchen and laundry in the main house. The other was a fully furnished basement with our own kitchen, but we had to enter through the main door and share the laundry upstairs. Overall these were good experiences, and we were very lucky to find furnished, short term rentals, with utilities included in the price, on Craigslist! Because Craigslist can definitely be hit or miss, and sometimes sketchy!

But unfortunately during our searches, we did find that there were extremely limited options for short term housing in the areas that we needed, with the criteria we wanted in an accommodation. When searching for short term housing as a traveler, you are definitely at the mercy of what’s available. So sometimes you’re either going to have to skimp on your ideal setup, or raise your budget, or possibly both.

Another consideration when choosing to set up short term housing as a traveler (whether on your own or with the company’s help), versus choosing an RV, is packing and moving often. This was a big thing we were trying to avoid by buying an RV. In an RV, you always have all your stuff with you, so you don’t have to constantly pack and move in and out of places. But, those travelers who do choose short term housing (again- the majority of travelers) do end up becoming pretty good at packing their cars and being minimalistic! And although it can be a headache sometimes, it’s just part of the traveler lifestyle and you get used to it!

Tiny Living or RV Life

Tiny living, van living, and RVing are definitely becoming more popular options for traveling healthcare providers. There is certainly some appeal to having your own home on wheels with you all the time, and traveling from place to place. To be honest, a lot of RVs now are just like little apartments, and you are by no means “camping outdoors” when living in an RV! However, tiny living is very much a lifestyle choice and not to be pursued by just anyone! It’s difficult to even compare it side by side with the alternative short term housing options, because it’s so different! I recommend not looking at this like option number 3, but like taking a left turn and pursuing a completely different path!

We chose to buy a camper pretty early in our travel PT careers, and there were several reasons why we thought this would work out better for us.

  • First, we thought it would make life easier to leave all of our stuff in the camper and just move it from place to place, without having to always pack, move in, and move out of places every 3 months or so!
  • Second, we thought finding campgrounds/RV parks would make the housing location search a lot easier than finding short term housing accommodations.
  • Third, we thought we would save a lot of money by buying the camper, staying cheaply at campgrounds, and then selling the camper when we were done.
  • Fourth, we thought it would be a cool adventure!

All of those were true, to some extent. However I don’t think it was exactly the all-around-perfect life choice that we envisioned when all was said and done.

Not having to pack and move all the time, and having all of our stuff in the camper with us all the time, was for sure a huge perk! We only had to do minimal “packing up” each time to make sure things didn’t fall down inside the camper. We could usually easily load up and move to a new place (if it was within driving distance) on a weekend, then get set up within an hour or so at the new place, and be back to work on Monday if we wanted!

The campground/RV Park finding process was easier than short term housing to an extent. However, it does sometimes limit the locations you can travel to. For example, it’s not as common to see RV Parks that allow long term (month to month) stays near bigger cities. We had pretty good luck finding them in suburban and rural areas, but it did limit us from going some places. The way we maneuvered this was, when presented with a potential contract to apply for, we instantly did a quick Google search to see if there were even any RV parks nearby before we submitted our applications for the job. That part made it a little more feasible. Because as compared with short term housing, you can’t always do a quick search to know whether there are places to rent readily available for the dates you need, before submitting for the job.

Financially, having the camper usually saved us on our monthly rent costs, with most campgrounds we stayed at costing between $300-900 per month. Whereas depending on the area, short term rentals could run you anywhere from $500-2500 per month! But, with an RV, you still have to account for the upfront cost of buying an RV, the costs for maintenance and repairs, and the depreciation on the vehicle if you plan to sell it afterwards. When all was said and done after factoring in these costs once we sold it, we probably about broke even over the course of 3 years. If you planned to keep it for shorter than 3 years, you’d most likely come out behind financially based on our calculations.

As far as adventure goes, it was certainly a fun experience and something we will be able to talk about for the rest of our lives! But it’s not for everyone. The part we didn’t really take into account were the maintenance and repairs. It’s like owning a house, but one that’s on wheels, with little parts that can break, and you can’t always easily find the part to replace or a repair person who knows how to fix it like at a normal house!

All in all, we are glad we chose to do the RV life for 3 years. But it did not come without its hassles and headaches. In the end, we were glad to sell it and not have the responsibility anymore! So this is a huge thing you need to take into consideration for yourself. Are you going to be the type of person who wants to maintain and upkeep your home on wheels? Or would you rather just rent short term housing and not have a place to worry about all the time?

What Type of Housing Is Best for You?

So what’s the best choice for housing as a traveling healthcare provider? I don’t think there’s one answer to this question. You really have to consider what type of person you are, and what you’re comfortable with. As I mentioned, most travelers will choose to go with short term housing and set up their own accommodations. But there’s always the option of letting the company set up housing for you for an assignment and seeing how that goes. Or if you’re feeling really adventurous, or already know you like the camper lifestyle, maybe you decide to jump into RVing/Tiny Living, but just make sure to do your research before making any big purchases!

I hope this information has been helpful to you in terms of deciding what types of housing will be best for you as a traveling healthcare provider! Happy Travels, and enjoy the journey!

 


Written by, Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC

Whitney has been a traveling physical therapist since 2015 and travels with her significant other and fellow Travel PT, Jared Casazza. Together they have a personal blog titled “Fifth Wheel PT,” which got its name from their 3 years traveling and living full time in a fifth wheel camper! Whitney and Jared have traveled for PT work up and down the east coast, and in their time off between contracts have traveled all over the world! Together with Jared, Whitney also mentors current and future travel therapists at their website TravelTherapyMentor.com. You can follow their travel journey on Instagram or Facebook @TravelTherapyMentor.

Navigating Travel Therapy as a Pair

Pros and Cons of Traveling Together

Whitney and I have been traveling as a physical therapist (PT) pair for almost 5 years now since we were new grad PTs in 2015. During this time, we have learned a lot about both the benefits and the disadvantages of traveling as a healthcare pair. Traveling with a healthcare partner can be a wonderful experience and can make pursuing a travel healthcare career much easier in some ways, but there are certainly some struggles to be had at times. If you’re considering pursuing travel therapy with a partner or friend, here are some of the biggest pros and cons you should consider, based on our experiences.

Pros:

  1. Having a guaranteed adventure buddy!It’s not uncommon for Whitney and I to have some sort of adventure planned nearly every single weekend when we’re away on travel assignments. This is especially true if we’re in an area where we’ve never been before and there are lots of things we want to do and see within a few hours drive. For example, while working in Massachusetts, we took weekend trips to Boston, New York City, Rhode Island x 2, Maine x 2, New Hampshire x 2, Vermont, Connecticut, Quebec City, and Montreal! That was a busy and exciting few months! In our opinion, going on hikes, visiting waterfalls, and exploring cities is a lot more fun with a partner. It’s certainly possible to find someone to explore with in a new area as a single traveler, but it can be much harder than taking your adventure buddy with you!
  2. Saving money on housing expenses!Our thoughts on this have actually shifted a little over time. Initially we looked at it as basically half the costs when traveling as a pair due to being able to split housing and utility costs when at each location. While this is true theoretically, in reality housing options are more limited and more expensive for a pair than for a single traveler in many cases. This is especially the case when comparing a single traveler that’s willing to rent a room in a house to a travel therapy pair. We’ve found that most people who are renting a room in their house don’t want two people there and if they will allow it, they always want higher rent each month. That almost always leaves the travel pair looking for an apartment of some sort, which can often be 2-3x as much as a room in a house. But, when comparing traveling as a pair and renting an apartment to traveling as a single traveler who wants their own space and isn’t willing to rent a room in a house, the pair will come out ahead by splitting housing and utility costs!
  3. Less potential loneliness!We’ve met tons of single travelers that seem to really thrive on getting a brand new start in each location. But we’ve also met many other single travelers that feel lonely when starting a new assignment, or never start traveling at all because they fear being away from everyone they know. This seems to be the case even more so for travel assignments in rural locations where there is less to do and it’s harder to meet people outside of the clinic. We find that many single travelers avoid rural locations because they’re afraid they won’t be able to meet new friends or find people to hang out with when population density is lower and options are more limited. Meanwhile, Whitney and I love traveling to rural places as a pair due to the more laid back environment, lower cost of living, and usually more friendly people. We know that even if we don’t meet new friends in the area that we will always have each other to hang out and do things with! And it decreases our loneliness from being far away from our home community, family and friends.

Cons:

  1. Less available jobs.This is definitely the biggest downside to traveling as a pair in our opinion. While there might be hundreds of open travel PT jobs throughout the country, there are usually less than a dozen jobs that are outpatient (the setting we prefer) and close enough to each other for us to consider at a given time. We’ve been lucky to mostly avoid lengthy commutes and find consistent outpatient jobs near each other, but we’ve had to be much more flexible on the location we’re willing to go to in order to make that happen. When we’re looking for new states to get licensed in, we aren’t necessarily looking for where we really want to go, but instead where we have the best chances of finding two outpatient jobs close to each other since that’s our main priority. For a travel therapy pair, it is vital to be lenient on either setting, location, or both, whereas a single traveler will undoubtedly be able to be more picky when job searching.
  2. Less negotiating power on new contracts.Anyone familiar with negotiation knows that the more good options you have, the more negotiating power you have. For a single traveler with many jobs that fit their criteria, it’s not a big deal if they miss out on a job by playing hardball to make a little extra money on a contract or passing on a job until the perfect one comes along. They’ll almost always be able to find something else that is decent with a start date in their desired time frame (provided they aren’t being too picky). For a travel pair, trying to negotiate for higher pay on good fitting contracts can lead to missing out on one or both of the jobs, which means going back to the drawing board and potentially one or more weeks of missed work. Because of this, Whitney and I only work with recruiters that we trust to give us their best offer right off the bat so we don’t risk missing out on two good jobs near each other, which can sometimes be tough to find.
  3. More difficulty finding housing.As mentioned above, a travel therapy pair will have less housing options in any given location than a single traveler will. This is simply due to the fact that landlords offering some rooms or small efficiency apartments will only accept an individual, not a pair. This difficulty with finding viable and affordable housing was the primary driver of us deciding to buy our fifth wheel camper. For our very first assignments in a rural area of Virginia, we spent dozens of hours trying to find housing, only to settle on a less than ideal place. Had we been single travelers, there were rooms in houses in the surrounding area where we could have stayed, but none of them would accept a pair!

Is Traveling as a Healthcare Pair for You?

When comparing travel therapy as a pair versus traveling as an individual, I really think the pros and cons even out. This depends highly on your personality though. If you’re an extroverted person who’s great at making new friends, is willing to rent a cheap room in a house, and isn’t worried about being lonely, then traveling by yourself will be an awesome adventure and you’ll almost certainly come out ahead when compared to a travel therapy pair. If you’re more introverted (like me O_O), wouldn’t want to rent a room and live with a stranger, and want someone to experience new things with, then traveling as a pair would probably be better.

Unfortunately not everyone has the ability to choose between the two, as we usually encounter single therapists that are going to travel by themselves or not at all, and couples or friends that are going to travel together or not at all. In that case, it’s important to understand the pros and cons and be willing to accept them whatever your situation happens to be, and employ certain strategies to make traveling successful!

Strategies for Traveling as a Pair

Taking into account these pros and cons for traveling as a pair, there are lots of strategies we’ve learned over time that go into being a successful travel pair. Here are our top suggestions for traveling as a pair:

  1. Be Flexible!As I alluded to above, it’s important for travel pairs to be flexible on setting, location, and/or pay in order to successfully line up two jobs together. These variables are always at play regardless of whether you’re traveling as a pair or traveling solo, but when traveling as a pair, your top priority has to be finding two good jobs close together, so the other factors have to go lower on your priority list. In an ideal situation, you’d always find two jobs together, in your favorite setting, in the perfect location, and with the highest pay. Sometimes all the stars align and this is the case, but realistically you need to be as flexible as possible on these factors to maintain consistent employment as a healthcare pair.
  2. Work with multiple recruiters!We always recommend that travelers, whether traveling solo or as a pair, work with more than one recruiter to give themselves the most job options and be able to compare how different recruiters/companies operate, and compare pay and benefits on different offers. However this is most crucial for travel pairs. It is much more challenging to find two jobs together, so pairs need to have as many job options available as possible. We generally recommend working with 3-4 different recruiters as a pair. While each recruiter will have access to some of the same jobs, they will each have some exclusive/direct jobs that the others may not have.
    • *For more information on the process of working with multiple recruiters and companies, check out this article.
    • *If you’d like specific recommendations from us for recruiters and companies that would work well for you as a pair, you can fill out this form.
  3. Strategically choose states licenses!In order to be more flexible on finding jobs, it’s important to have at least 2-3 different state licenses. You need to be strategic in choosing these state licenses, based on which states tend to have the most jobs for your disciplines. Over time, we’ve tracked different job lists and talked to several recruiters to learn the trends for which states tend to have more PT jobs for us. We also pay attention to which states tend to have two jobs closer together that will work well for us as a PT pair. In our experience, some states that have been good for PT pairs are: California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia. We have made sure to get licensed in a couple of these states, and we always have the license in advance before applying to jobs in each state.
  4. Scope out housing in advance!A final piece of advice we have for lining up travel jobs as a pair is being aware of the housing situation before accepting your contracts. Quite often, recruiters will try to pitch two jobs close together to you, stating that if you “live in the middle,” then you will each only have a commute of “X” time or distance. However, sometimes when you start looking more closely, you’ll see that there’s no way to actually live in the middle to make this a realistic commute for the both of you. Often, the only real housing options are closer to one job or the other, making the commute unrealistic for one of you, or the area has really bad traffic, so even though on the map it looks close, the commute time would be insane. We always try to at least scope out the housing options to see if there are viable options that will make the two jobs worth our while before we accept a position. Ideally, you’d try to secure the housing before accepting, but this is not always possible with how quickly contracts move in the travel healthcare world. So at least do a little housing research before you agree to any contracts!

The Bottom Line for This Travel Pair

For both Whitney and I, I don’t think we would have been adventurous enough to travel by ourselves, and we almost certainly wouldn’t have continued to travel for almost 5 years now if we weren’t traveling as a pair. Travel therapy as a pair has not only provided us with countless adventures and lifestyle flexibility but has also brought us closer together as a couple when we encounter the inevitable hardships. Despite the challenges that sometimes come with traveling as a pair, we wouldn’t change anything we’ve done to this point for the world!

If you’re a current traveler (individual or pair) let us know about your experience in the comments below!

 

Written by Jared Casazza, PT, DPT

Jared and his girlfriend Whitney have been traveling as a physical therapist pair since 2015. Together they form Travel Therapy Mentor and offer free advice and mentorship to current and future travel therapists!

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