Working in Schools as a Travel Therapist

Written by Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC

For PT’s, OT’s, SLP’s and assistants interested in taking travel contracts working with pediatrics, sometimes these jobs can be harder to come by than other settings. The most common settings available for travel positions include home health, SNF, acute, and outpatient orthopedics. But for those looking to work in peds, school contracts may be a great option!

You might be wondering how school contracts are set up for a traveler. Do you have to work the full school year? What is the pay like? Do you get paid during school breaks? Since this setting is a bit different than others, we wanted to provide some key information to working in school contracts as a traveler.

The Basics of Working School Contracts

Most school contracts will typically be for the full school year, but some schools are open to just doing half the school year with the possibility of extending, or a little less than that even. Every situation is different, so if you’re unsure if you want to commit to a full year, work with your recruiter and the facility to find out what’s possible.

When school jobs are listed with an “ASAP” start date and it’s the middle of the school year, that contract would be from now or as soon as you could start, until the end of this school year. If you see a job listed with a July or August start, that would be for the upcoming school year.

Schools will typically have a very low facility cancellation rate, making it a pretty stable commitment on your end. This is helpful to know because as a traveler, you need to consider planning your housing for the duration of the contract.

The typical hours you will see for a school contract are between 35-37.5 hours per week. There are some contracts with 40 hour weeks, but it’s not usually the norm. Although most are not 40 hour guarantees, the rates are usually a bit higher in this setting which can help to offset the lower hours. This may bring your weekly take home to be similar or even better than a normal 40 hour work week in another setting.

A cool perk to working in schools is you have all of the school holidays off, so you know your days off in advance, and they are setup around desirable holidays/days people want to take off anyways. The uncool part of this, is you may not get paid during school holidays. So you will have to plan accordingly around this.

If you are off for the entire week for a school holiday (such as Spring Break or Winter Break), you will not be paid at all for that week. However, if you are off for only part of the week for the holiday, you may still receive your full week’s per diems, or part of the week’s per diems, in addition to the hourly pay for the days you did work. It’s important you clarify this with your travel company to understand how your pay will work around school holidays.

What Disciplines Are Most Needed?

The majority of school positions tend to be open for SLP, but there are options for PT’s, OT’s, PTA’s, and COTA’s as well. The market can vary across different states and school districts with different needs.

School positions often accept and support CF SLPs as well. However, this may or may not be a desirable setting for a lot of SLPs coming out of school that may be more interested in medical job settings.

What Questions Should I Ask During an Interview?

Not all travel therapy school positions are created equally. There are some important questions you should consider asking during your interview to decide if a contract is right for you, which might include:

  • How many children will be on caseload?
  • Who are the other staff members? (PT, OT, SLP, aids, etc.)
  • Have you had a travel therapist there before?
  • What is the facility like? (equipment, etc.)
  • What will my hours be?
  • Will I be covering more than one school?
  • What age groups will I be covering?

What Are Some Pros & Cons to Working School Contracts?

There are some benefits to working in schools pertaining to taking a longer (full school year) contract, which include more job stability; moving less often between contracts (as opposed to the typical 13 week travel contract); exploring an area for a longer period of time; and potentially saving on housing costs with a longer lease.

Another benefit is that you have planned time off to be able to take trips, and this time off is usually around holidays when you may want to spend time with family and friends.

Another potential benefit would be building your skill set in a different setting. This could be especially important with pending changes in Medicare, which could affect the market for settings such as Skilled Nursing Facilities.

However, for some people, there could be cons to taking a school contract. Some may consider committing to a full school year as limiting their ability to travel and see the country. They may also have fear of getting locked into a long contract without knowing if it’ll be the right fit for them. Fortunately for this concern, we as travelers have the option of a 14 or 30 day cancellation notice if placed in a bad situation.

Another con can be the paperwork and IEP meetings involved in working in schools. As with every setting, you have to take into consideration the documentation and meetings involved, which is the not-so-fun part of our jobs as healthcare providers.

And the last consideration would be not getting paid during school holidays. This may require some additional budgeting on the traveler’s part, or working with the recruiter to rearrange the pay package as needed. But for many travelers who tend to take a week or so off between their normal 13 week travel contracts to travel for leisure, relax and recharge, or go home to visit family and friends, these school breaks can provide the same thing, just structured a bit differently.

Is a School Contract Right for You as a Traveler?

Some clinicians absolutely love working with pediatrics and in the school setting. For others, this may be a totally new experience. As with any travel therapy job, you will have to take into consideration many factors when choosing if a particular school contract is right for you.

If you have questions or would like help getting started with your travel therapy journey, please contact us!

What to Look for in a Home Health Travel Therapy Contract

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT

Home health can be a great option for travel therapists due to the abundant need for therapists to serve patients in this setting. If you are willing to take home health contracts, options for locations will open up dramatically at any given time, and usually you can command even higher pay than normal. To see if home health may work for you, check out my pros and cons article here.

Since home health is a bit different than other settings, you may be wondering what things you should look for in a home health contract and what questions you should ask in an interview for this setting. Here is a more in depth look at some important aspects of a home health contract that you should consider:

  • Training:
    • Find out how much training will be provided by the company. This is especially important if you don’t have prior experience in this setting.
    • Tips during training: Take the computer from your trainer and document as much as possible. You know how to be a therapist, but as I mentioned in the pros and cons article, there is a lot of documentation in home health, so you really want to start getting familiar with the system as soon as possible.
    • Of course, you should also pay attention to the differences in care that you’ll be providing in home health because there are some important safety issues to take note of during evaluations, but otherwise the therapy you’ll be providing is similar to other settings.
    • In our experience, my wife Julia and I have received about two weeks of training at the home health contracts we have taken.
  • Points system:
    • You want to find out how their productivity works, and if it’s on a points system vs. hourly vs. purely based on number of visits regardless of type. This is an important measure of productivity that is different from every other setting. Your company may assign a certain number of points to each type of visit based on the length of time they predict this visit taking (I am sure that it is also based on the reimbursement from insurance).
    • For example, the last home health contract we did had the following points system:
      • 2.5 points for start of care/OASIS
      • 1.5 points for evaluation
      • 1.25 for discharge
      • 1 point per regular visit
    • In a 40 hour week we were expected to complete 30 points at that company.Β  The numbers generally are similar to these from what I have heard from others. This is also how many full time and PRN employees are paid in home health instead of hourly/salary.
  • Travel Radius:
    • You want to find out how far you will be expected to drive and what areas you will be covering for your home health visits.
    • This is going to be the number one factor outside of your personal efficiencies with documentation and planning that is going to affect your productivity capabilities.
    • At our first contract, our travel radius was very similar and only about 15 miles from the office for either one of us. At our second contract, my radius stayed about the same, but the majority of my patients were located in a 10 mile radius of the city in my territory; while Julia’s was a larger territory, probably 20 miles, and her patients were more spread out as there was no main city in her territory.
    • This is something that is hard to figure out before you take a contract. We didn’t even know exactly where our territories were going to be when we took our second contract due to the huge territory the company covered. There were many days where I would only drive 15-25 miles in total, and Julia would drive 50-60 miles.
    • Obviously the more you drive, the tougher it is to hit your productivity standards. Your best bet is to ask how many miles you can expect to drive in a day/week in the interview. You can also ask around to find out about the area and the traffic before committing.
  • Mileage Reimbursement:
    • Find out if they reimburse for mileage and how much.
    • We do not recommend you take a home health position unless they are going to reimburse you for mileage.
    • You want to be making at least 50 cents per mile no matter what, and personally if I ever do home health again I will demand the government rate of 58 cents per mile. The mileage is not only for your gas consumption, but also for the wear and tear on your vehicle. If you are planning to do home health for an extended period of time, getting a fuel efficient vehicle is highly recommended as well.

These are a few of the key factors you want to consider when looking into taking a home health contract as a travel therapist. Home health can be a rewarding setting to work in, especially because it can be flexible for your lifestyle. But you want to make sure to ask the right questions so that you won’t be stretched too thin when it comes to number of visits, driving radius, gas, and wear and tear on your car. If you have more questions about working in home health, or have a specific job offer you’d like to discuss with us, please reach out to us for mentorship!