Travel Therapy Licensing Process

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT with contributions by Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC


Licensing and housing are probably the two most frustrating and challenging aspects of being a travel healthcare professional. We will cover housing in future articles, but let’s dig in to the current state of licensing, and I’ll give an overview of how my wife Julia and I, as well as Jared and Whitney, have attempted to navigate licensing as traveling physical therapists thus far.

How Does Licensing Work as a Travel Therapist?

In general, if you want to work in a different state as a travel therapist, you need to get licensed in each individual state where you plan to work. There is a “PT Compact” license that has begun for physical therapists, which makes the licensing process much easier for those who are eligible for the compact. Some type of compact license is also in the works for occupational therapists, but has not been passed yet. But, with the exception of the small percentage of therapists that can take advantage of a compact (or multi-state) license currently, the rest of us have to take care of licensing the old fashioned way.

What does licensing entail? Generally, an application, a fee, sometimes a jurisprudence/law exam (usually can be taken online or sent in on paper, but some states require you to test at a testing center), sometimes fingerprinting, and sending in a lot of verifications including: school transcripts, original board exam scores, and verifications that your license is in good standing from all other states in which you are licensed.

In some cases, travel therapy companies can help with the licensing process. Generally, this means they will reimburse you for a license once you’ve obtained it yourself and have accepted a contract with their company in that state. Sometimes, they can help you with the licensing process up front, including paying some of the costs and doing some of the leg work for you. But this is usually only once you are already a current traveler of theirs and are looking into your next contract with them in a new state.

Our Approach to Licensing Thus Far

We certainly don’t have all the answers, and like housing, there are multiple approaches and techniques to the licensing process that can all be successful for different travelers at different times. As a couple, finding positions has generally been time consuming and difficult, and starting contracts when we want has been challenging. Our friends who travel solo have found it much easier to find positions in the states in which they are interested and in a more timely manner than we have.

At first, we decided to only look at quick license states, meaning that we could look for jobs in states that would allow us time to find the job first and then get the license second. Therefore, we would ensure that we were only paying for the license once the job was already secured, instead of wasting time and money getting licensed in several states without knowing if we would actually take a job there. This tactic was primarily because we were broke after grad school (I’m sure most of you can relate) and couldn’t afford to pay for multiple licenses out of our own pocket up front, with the hopes of taking positions in those locations and then getting reimbursed.

We started with our first license and job in Arizona, because that is our home state, and we were getting that license no matter what. Next, we went to South Carolina, because it was a quick license state.

A note about “quick license” states: They are quick once they get all your paperwork, but most still require paper verifications from your current licensed states, and this can be a very timely process in itself. Licensing makes me speak very negatively about our state governments when they take two weeks to print out and send a piece of paper that I paid them $15-$25 to send! In the case of South Carolina, our start date was delayed two weeks because of the license verification from Arizona.

After that fiasco, we became more proactive and decided to get licenses up front in West Virginia, Kentucky, Maryland, and Tennessee while on contract in South Carolina, so we would not have a delay again in starting our next contracts. This seemed like a great idea at the time, and we figured a couple thousand dollars we spent on these licenses could be recouped fairly quickly.

This once again turned out to be a losing plan, after taking two extra weeks to find positions, we finally accepted positions in New Mexico (notice New Mexico was not on the list of licenses we had!) and started that licensing process there due to not being able to even interview for any positions in the other states. Again, the other states where we were already licensed made getting this license expensive and time consuming. New Mexico also lost half of the documents that were sent in. Luckily, the staff there was actually helpful unlike other states (cough West Virginia cough), and after 8 hours on the phone, we were able to get our licenses pushed through even though they did not have all the physical documents that were required.

What We’ve Learned About Licensing

So, where are we currently with licenses and what have we learned? Well, as of this point we are back working in Arizona, and seeing as that is our home state, we will be keeping that license. We still have New Mexico and Kentucky, but will be letting Kentucky expire in March 2019 instead of renewing. We already let the rest of them expire instead of paying to renew them.

Right now we are in the process of getting our California licenses, because California is reportedly a gold mine for travel therapy couples, and it is a gorgeous state. The current plan is to hang out in California and Arizona until our home state of Arizona starts issuing compact license privileges, and then use the compact to be able to move around the country again.

You can find out more about the PT Licensure Compact here.

What About Jared and Whitney’s Experience?

So far, Whitney and Jared have had a little better go at licensing than us, for the most part. Similarly, they chose to start by working in their home state of Virginia. After that, they were methodical in their licensing choices, and chose to get licensed in advance in each state rather than wait until after they found jobs to get licensed. They always chose states based on trends of which states tended to have the most PT jobs, since they also travel as a couple.

They chose their next state, Massachusetts, based on seeing a lot of job options in that area, and that choice worked out well with them being able to find two jobs together for their desired start date after they were already licensed. Next, they chose North Carolina, for the same reason. They wanted to be in South Carolina, Georgia, or Florida ideally, but they were seeing a lot more jobs show up in pairs in North Carolina, so they went with that. And, that ended up being another good choice, with them able to start with two jobs in the same area right on time, after they were already licensed.

After North Carolina, they chose Illinois due to seeing a lot of jobs there in general, but this choice never quite panned out. They ended up letting this license lapse and never used it. For what ever reason, the timing wasn’t right and they weren’t able to nail down two jobs together in Illinois. Similarly, they got licensed in Arizona due to a high number of PT jobs, but so far the timing has not worked out for them to go to Arizona either. They plan to keep this license though and use it in the future.

So, their travels have been a little limited due to licensing restrictions, and they’ve only ended up working in Virginia, Massachusetts, and North Carolina so far in 3.5 years of being travel therapists. But, a big reason for this also is that they were risk averse, and did not want to waste a lot of money on licenses if they didn’t think they’d use them, so they’ve held off on some opportunities because of that.

They too are holding out for their home state of Virginia to start issuing compact license privileges, which will significantly open up their options. Otherwise, they plan to get one to two more licenses, including California and possibly Washington due to lots of PT opportunities in those states, making it more likely to find two jobs together as a pair.

Take Home Points

The licensing process can be challenging and frustrating as a travel therapist, especially when traveling as a pair. All of this is at least twice as easy if you are traveling as a solo healthcare professional, but you may still have some of the same challenges that we have faced.

In general, you have a few different strategies you can use to approach licensing, which include:

  1. Pick a state you think will have good job options, one at a time, and get licensed in advance. Have the license in hand, then start looking for jobs there.
  2. Look for jobs in quick license states, and then if you find a job, get the license there afterwards.
  3. Get a few different licenses up front to open up your options before starting to look for jobs.

Although this process can be cumbersome, it is still doable. Many therapists don’t have near the trouble Julia and I have had, especially those traveling by themselves. Jared and Whitney had a fairly easy time with licensing and job finding for the first 2+ years, and have only recently run into some hiccups. If you play your cards right, you’ll still have a great experience as a travel therapist, as long as you’re somewhat flexible and willing to go with the flow if setbacks do happen.

Let us know what strategies have worked or failed for you for licensing! We are always open to hearing ideas from fellow travelers. Have questions for us about licensing? Send us a message!

Opinion: How Much Vacation Is Too Much?

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT


What is your dream vacation or retirement? For most of our country, it seems the goal of working is to retire, and retirement means an endless vacation doing whatever we want. Julia and I took an eye-opening vacation recently while on break between our Travel Physical Therapy positions in New Mexico and Arizona. We went to Hawaii, more specifically Maui and Oahu, for nearly three weeks to relax, hike, swim, surf, snorkel, etc. — as well as see some friends that are living there.

This seemed like an ideal vacation, and it was for about 10 days, but then something unexpected happened. Even with being active throughout the days in the water and hiking, we both found ourselves with achy bodies. More importantly, we found ourselves unfulfilled in an amazing destination; we felt as though we didn’t have a purpose.

We concluded that for us, all future extended vacations will need to be a combination of “voluntourism” and exploration to allow us to have a purpose, help people, and see beautiful parts of the world. This is something we both knew we would want to do in the future anyway, but we were both surprised to find that it will be necessary for our vacations to be fulfilling. We realized, that while we are still going to pursue financial independence so that we don’t need to punch the time clock in the future, we will likely never truly retire.

One great thing for us is that we have found a profession that allows us job flexibility, so that we may never have to truly “retire,” and that is Travel Physical Therapy. This has allowed us the opportunity to still work and feel as though we have a purpose, while getting to travel around to different parts of the country and go on endless adventures. Additionally, we have the opportunity to take time off whenever we want to or feel like we need a change, such as a week to a few weeks between contracts to explore a new area, go on a volunteer trip, or rest and recharge.

We are very fortunate to have this as a career option, so we don’t see ourselves with the urge to “retire” anytime soon, despite the fact we are saving and working toward financial independence.

In my opinion, travel therapy gives us the perfect work-life balance. I feel that a life of endless vacation would be unfulfilling; but a life where I have many options to work, not work, volunteer, take time off, travel, vacation— whatever I want, that’s a great life.


What’s your take on this? Do you think endless vacation would be great, or not? Where does travel therapy come into play for you? Let us know!

 

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Author: Travis Kemper, PT, DPT

Pursuing Travel Therapy in 2019

Written by Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC


Are you thinking about starting travel therapy in 2019? You’re not alone!

The start of a new year is a popular time to be thinking about pursuing travel therapy. New grads who wrapped up in December or those looking forward to graduation in May are considering travel therapy. Experienced clinicians looking for a change in career path are considering it too. Maybe you’ve been thinking about it for a while, but now’s the time to finally jump in!

New year… new you… new job… new travels!

If you’re considering starting a travel therapy career in 2019, here are a few tips to help you get started:

1. Contact a few travel therapy companies & recruiters.

  • You need to talk with a few to find out who you like best and who you want to work with. You should do some research online and ask around, but it’s most important that you talk with the recruiters yourself and find out who fits best with you! Ask about the company benefits, in what areas they have jobs, and what a typical pay package looks like!
  • You’ll want to work with 2-3 usually at the same time to give you the best options for jobs. Remember, “working with” or “talking to” several companies does not lock you into being an employee of that company. You’re only committed to them when you take a contract with them!
  • If you would like our recommendations for travel therapy companies and recruiters we know and trust, send us a message!

2. Start researching states where you want to work.

  • It’s important to look at the job market and see where you are likely to find the best job for you. Some states tend to have more jobs than others, and some states will have more jobs in a particular setting than others.
  • You need to find out about the licensing process for each state and get started on licensing for where you want to go!

3. Do your homework on pay packages and tax laws.

  • You want to be an informed traveler and make sure you’re not being taken advantage of when it comes to pay. You also need to understand your own personal tax situation, as your recruiter may not be the best person to give you advice on this.
  • To learn more about how pay works as a travel therapist, check out this comprehensive guide to pay as a traveler.
  • We also recommend you read up on tax laws pertaining to working as a travel healthcare professional at TravelTax.com.

4. Start thinking about the logistics!

  • There’s a lot that goes into being a travel therapist. Where will you live while on assignment? Do you understand what a tax home is and have yours all set? What will you bring with you? When is your anticipated start date, and how much time will that give you to get from A to B? Are you traveling alone, or with pets, or with a significant other?
  • This is an exciting, stressful, fun, and crazy time! There’s a huge learning curve when you first get started, but once you get the hang of it and embrace the lifestyle it’s an amazing journey!

Do you have questions about getting started on your travel therapy journey? If you would like to learn more, check out our Ultimate Guide to Getting Started as a Travel Therapist.

If you have any questions about travel therapy or need advice on getting started, please feel free to reach out to us! We are happy to help!

Wishing you the best of luck in your travel therapy adventures in 2019!

~Travel Therapy Mentors Whitney, Jared, and Travis

What Kind of Travel Therapist Will You Be?

Written by Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC


The world of travel therapy is an exciting one. There are so many options and possibilities as a travel therapist. We as U.S. healthcare professionals are fortunate to have this as an avenue to travel down, so to speak, not only professionally but personally.

There are so many different types of travelers out there, from new grads, to those with a few years experience, those in the middle of their careers, or those close to retirement.

There are “career” travelers who do it forever and ever, amen, and never plan on settling down. There are “just testing it out” travelers who take a contract or two. There are ones who take travel contracts part of the year and work at home part of the year. There are “I just want to travel to places where my kids and grandkids live and make a little money along the way” travelers. And everywhere in between.

What kind of travel therapist will you be?

Let’s talk about some of the key reasons that many therapists choose to travel, what motivates and drives them… (but, of course, most of us are driven by a combination of all these factors!) …and see where you can relate!

In it for the Money

Yes, yes, this is often the big one. Income. Paychecks. Most therapists hear that travel therapy can afford them higher income than a permanent position, and for many different circumstances this is enticing.

For those who need to pay down a high amount of student debt, more money can be the key to becoming debt free. For those with families, more money can mean a better lifestyle, or less time spent working and more time spent with family, or that one spouse may not have to work at all. And for just about anyone, more money means more options.

Lots of therapists travel solely for the purpose of making more money, and they will chase the highest paying contracts no matter what. For most, it’s some combination of money and other factors that drives them to choose travel therapy.

You can check out this article to better understand how travel therapy pay works and how you can earn more money as a travel therapist.

Are you planning to travel just for higher pay?

All about Schedule Flexibility

When you work as a travel therapist, you are a “contract” worker, and therefore you are only employed while on contract. This means you can be in control of when you work and when you take time off. Gone are the days of only having two weeks of vacation time or PTO!

For many, this allows a lot of flexibility to be able to spend more time with family for special events and holidays, or to take time off to travel for leisure. In addition, since most travelers make more money than they would at a traditional position, they can in most cases afford to take additional time off, while still making enough money to support their lifestyles.

For some, such as me and my boyfriend Jared, this could mean working part of the year and traveling internationally the other part of the year. We just finished a 5 month trip around the world, are taking additional time off for the holidays with family, and plan to take a new travel PT contract next month.

The possibilities for how you want your schedule and your life to look are endless as a travel therapist.

Do you plan to use travel therapy to take extended periods of time off?

Adventure Junkies

For many, the excitement of traveling around the country and having adventures in new places is what draws them to travel therapy.

Who else gets to go live in a new city, state, region for +/- 3 months, instead of just visiting for a few days or a week?

It’s amazing the experiences you can have when you’re living in a new area. Even the normal, mundane, day to day activities are exciting. New grocery store, new weekend farmer’s market, new gym, new local coffee shop, new dog park.

Not to mention hiking all the trails, exploring all the beaches, skiing all the slopes, hitting up the local events, trying out new breweries and wineries, and catching local bands. Plus so, so much more!

Adventure is just around the corner for travel therapists, and more therapists are discovering it all the time.

Are you dreaming of the adventures you can have as a travel therapist?

The Social Butterfly

Want to meet new people? Looking for friendships across the states? Looking to find love? Why not travel for work and open up your circle!

Becoming a travel therapist can give you lots of opportunities to meet new people. Whether it’s co-workers, new friends at the gym, a new church community, a volunteer group, or local “meet-ups” — the possibilities are endless if you’re willing to put yourself out there!

Of course, I’d be remiss to say that traveling always helps you make new friends. Some travelers can feel quite lonely in a new place. Sometimes building strong friendships in such a short time can be challenging, and sometimes locals are not willing to open their circle to a newcomer, especially someone so transient.

But, that’s not always the case, and quite often travel therapists can make amazing connections in each place they go! This can mean having a whole new “family” across the country, or even finding a group of people you love so much, you want to stay!

Are you searching for new connections?

The New Setting Hopper

Some therapists choose to use travel therapy to broaden their skill sets. As a traveler, you have the opportunity to hop from one setting to another and gain a wealth of experience.

Many therapists will choose to stick with one or a couple of their favorite settings, but many want to expand their resume and skill set. Travel therapy is the perfect opportunity for this. As long as the facility understands you may need some additional training if you do not have a lot of experience in that setting, and you feel confident and competent enough to work there, you can dip your foot into new settings to see what you think!

Travel therapy affords a rare opportunity to hop from one setting to another, an opportunity that most therapists would never get.

Do you want to try out new settings, without the commitment of a permanent position?

What Kind of Travel Therapist Will You Be?

Do any of the above reasons resonate with you? What do you see your travel life looking like? There are so many possibilities, and no two travel therapists are alike.

If you’re ready to get started in your travel therapy career and would like guidance and recommendations, please reach out to us! We would be happy to help mentor you on your travel journey!

Travel Therapy: Pros and Cons of Home Health

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT

As travel therapists, there are a lot of opportunities to work in home health across the nation. And, the pay is usually pretty high which makes it an attractive option. It might be even more attractive for someone who is getting started as a new grad and looking at a large amount of debt to pay off. Recruiters often offer to submit new grad therapists to home health positions; but, as with everything, there are some positive and negatives to consider with home health therapy that should be taken into account before being submitted.

Here’s my take on working in home health after doing my first two travel physical therapy contracts in the setting. I will expand further on each bullet point below to give you a more comprehensive view of my thoughts, but here is an overview of the basics:

PROS:

  1. Even as a new grad, you have will the opportunity to dramatically improve the quality of care that patients are receiving in this setting.
  2. You can create closer relationships with patients than in most settings, and potentially make a larger impact on their personal lives than in other settings.
  3. You can make your own schedule, or at least have a significant amount of flexibility in your schedule.
  4. The pay is much higher than other areas of practice, although of course pay also depends on location.

CONS:

  1. On the flip side of #1 from the “pro” list, the con in this situation is that your colleagues may not be the best and your patients may not be receiving the best care across the board.
  2. There may be the potential for less growth as a clinician in this setting.
  3. Sometimes there are higher productivity requirements.
  4. There is more time spent in front of a computer than in other areas, and way more time being sedentary. The paperwork is much more intense than any other setting where I have worked.

 

Let’s take a closer look at the positive aspects of working in home health:

1. As a clinician, and even as a new grad, you can dramatically improve the quality of care that patients are receiving: This is in some ways a pro and a con.  The pro is obvious: you can literally be a rock-star clinician in home health on day one. I was told on numerous occasions, by numerous people, that I was the best home health provider that has ever come to see the patient. That’s awesome, and very rewarding for you as a clinician, but also incredibly sad. Check out the cons list below to see the flip side of this.

 

2. Potential for increased quality of relationships: I have patients/caregivers that still contact me from across the country to tell me how much they appreciate the work I did for them. There is a great potential to make a larger impact in your patients’ lives than in other settings. There is nothing in healthcare that can prepare you to see how a patient moves in his/her home environment. Sometimes you must get creative to make their homes work for them. I routinely helped patients redesign their living rooms to make them safer, and I also removed two bathroom doors because the patients’ assistive device would not fit through the door and the patients could not safely access the commode without a device.

 

3. More flexibility in your schedule: Because you can design how your day looks with visiting each patient, it allows things like making stops to the post office or other businesses that have daytime only hours much easier to manage. It also makes it easier to design a schedule that works for you as an individual, within reason.

 

4. Higher pay than other settings: This depends on the location, but home health is almost always one of the highest paying settings. This is a huge pro for choosing to work in this setting. More money, more options in life.

 

Let’s take a closer look at the negative aspects of working in home health:

1. Other clinicians in this setting may be sub-par: As I mentioned above, sometimes you can really stand out in home health as an amazing clinician, because unfortunately sometimes the patients are receiving sub-optimal care from other clinicians. Sometimes, depending on the team you are working with, you may have to perform tasks or communication for the patient that is more appropriate for another discipline, such as nursing, social work, or another therapist, or else the patient will not get the care they deserve. For example, at one point I worked with an OT who would perform an evaluation, make goals, and on the next visit perform a discharge stating all goals were met, when the patient had not received or been trained on half of the recommended equipment. This happened with several patients. Unfortunately, when providers are paid for quantity, as is the case with most home health companies (presumably because that is how insurance pays the company), quality of care will decrease from most providers. This caused me a lot of stress because I care about my patients, and I get incredibly frustrated when I see sub-par care.

Here’s a quote that I feel is appropriate to my experience in this situation: “People that aren’t used to quality always chase quantity.”- unknown

 

2. Potential for less growth as a clinician: When it comes to growth as a clinician, I believe you grow by seeing and interacting with other therapists as well as performing personal research, going to conferences, and earning CEUs. In home health, although you often work with a team, you are by yourself almost all the time. I truly feel that as a physical therapist, I did not grow nearly as much in this setting as in other settings where I have worked.

 

3. High productivity standards are standard: This has obvious downsides. I have only taken hourly positions in home health, but the company will still try to enforce productivity standards on you. This is the toughest thing, especially with the cons listed about your potential coworkers and why you can be a “rock-star” as a new grad, which requires extra work from you if you want you to provide the best care. This combined with last con on the list (see below) are the reasons that, unfortunately, I probably won’t be doing home health anymore.

 

4. Lastly, the paperwork is brutal! People have tried to tell me that it is no worse than other settings, but I have worked in just about every setting between clinicals and paid positions, and it is by far the worst in my opinion. Every day I would spend half my day documenting, and that was with doing as much as possible in the home with the patient.  Combine documentation time with drive time, and you have landed a sedentary profession. I chose a career with physical in the title. I don’t want to sit, and I hate computers!

Conclusion

Overall, I think home health can be a great place for the right person. If you’re very organized and don’t mind increased paperwork, you can make a huge impact in this setting right away and really feel you’ve provided a lot of value to your patients. But, there are definitely some cons to consider, and you want to make sure to ask all the right questions before going into a contract in home health.

I hope this helps you! Please feel free to reach out with any questions about home health here. I will happily look at your contract, set up a phone call to chat about home health, or provide any other assistance I can.

Stay tuned for a future post about specific questions I recommend asking during a home health interview!

Career Development as a Travel Therapist

Written by: Jared Casazza, PT, DPT

A major uncertainty that all of us here at Travel Therapy Mentor faced when embarking on our travel therapy careers as new grads was how this decision would affect our career development. We each had clinical instructors and professors advise against starting out as a traveler due to a perceived need for mentorship as a new grad. While mentorship is undoubtedly helpful for most new grads, it is definitely not required nor a given for those going straight into a full time permanent position after graduation.

Additionally, although travel therapists may not follow the exact same trajectory for career development as a therapist in a permanent position, for example by becoming established in one clinic, in one community, or in a specialty area, there are other benefits to career development that are unique to travel therapy that could not otherwise be gained.

Mentorship as a Travel Therapist

For my first travel contract, I unintentionally interviewed for an acute care position despite having no acute care experience, due to the job being listed as inpatient rehab accidentally by the travel company. During the interview with the facility manager I discovered that the job listing was incorrect and told the manager that I wasn’t interested since I didn’t have any experience with acute care. To my surprise, after the interview, my recruiter informed me that the manager at the facility thought I would be a good fit. To encourage me to take the position, she had even increased the pay, offered me the ability to shadow for the first week, offered an easier caseload for the next two weeks, and offered mentorship from another PT there. I was hesitant, but the offer sounded great and was a short drive to another job that Whitney interviewed for and liked.

I ended up taking the job and loved it! Not only did I get to shadow a current PT there for several days to learn more about acute care and the facility, but when I did start treating patients, she stayed with me for the entire first two weeks I was there to make sure I was comfortable. Once I started with the full caseload on my own, I had the ability to ask for help from other PTs and PTAs in the facility whenever I needed it. This opportunity as a travel therapist allowed me to try out a setting that I never would have otherwise, and to my surprise I actually really enjoyed acute care (and learning wound care!) despite my preconceived notions about it. In the end, I wound up getting more assistance and mentorship than many of my PT school classmates that took permanent positions right after graduation.

Although this isn’t the norm by any means, there are facilities that will help to mentor new grads even as travelers. Some travel companies even have jobs that are listed as “new-grad friendly” meaning that the facility understands that the new grad will likely need at least a little help when starting out, and there are other staff members available to help. Many travel companies also offer a mentor that is able to be reached by phone in the event that the traveler wants to discuss something related to clinical practice, ethics, or documentation. Whitney took advantage of this a few times during her first contract, and we both talked to a clinical mentor when we took skilled nursing jobs and were struggling in the beginning.

All in all, mentorship is usually not significantly different between a travel contract and a permanent job for new grads in our experience.

Learning from Different Clinicians, Facilities, and Settings

Travel therapy does offer some other unique opportunities with regard to career development that wouldn’t be possible at a permanent position. Getting to move from facility to facility and learn from a variety of different clinicians has been invaluable for me over the past few years. To date, I’ve had to ability to learn from dozens of more experienced physical therapists and integrate different aspects of their practice that I admired and enjoyed into my own practice. This includes manual therapy techniques, exercises, documentation tips, and different strategies and analogies to use for patient education. In general, therapists are very open and willing to help and teach any clinician who is interested and, if taken advantage of, this is a big benefit for travelers in developing as clinicians.

Another aspect of career development that is aided by traveling is the ability to experience many styles of management, scheduling, staffing, and building layouts. This might be especially important to those therapists who may plan to move into management roles or open their own clinics. At this point, I have worked under some wonderful managers who have set up great work environments whose style I could do my best to emulate if I ever find myself in a management position in the future. I’ve also worked under some very poor managers that have fostered a work environment that is toxic, and it’s easy to find to qualities that led to that which would be vital to avoid. Through various clinics I’ve worked in, I’ve learned exactly the type of staffing and scheduling that I would implement as a manager or clinic owner in the future from seeing what has worked and what hasn’t. Even for those who don’t plan to move into a management position, having these experiences could be beneficial to your resume as a staff therapist. Hiring managers may look favorably on your experience with a variety of facilities and be open to any suggestions you may have for improving their facility and operations.

In addition to experiencing various facilities, you can also easily switch between practice settings as a travel therapist, which would be very difficult as a permanent employee. In three years of traveling, I have worked in acute care, private practice outpatient, hospital based outpatient, physician owned outpatient, skilled nursing, wound care, and home health. Not only has this kept me from getting bored in any one particular setting, but it has allowed me to find aspects of different settings that are appealing to me. I would have never imagined that I would enjoy wound care, acute care, or home health, but after working in those settings for a few months, I found aspects of each that really appealed to me, and I plan to revisit them in the future. In addition, I believe that seeing patients at all points of the rehab process can help to make the clinician more well rounded and empathetic to the patient’s situation. Watching a patient go from acute care to skilled nursing to outpatient, and then eventually transitioning to a home exercise program was something that was extremely gratifying to me. These experiences broadened my perspective and understanding of what some patients have to go through to eventually reach the point where they are in the outpatient setting. I would have never gotten this perspective by just seeing them for a short time in the outpatient setting, which I always thought was the only setting where I wanted to practice.

Conclusion

I think many experienced clinicians have the impression that travel therapy makes it difficult to evolve and grow as a therapist, but in our experience this is far from the truth. We here at Travel Therapy Mentor have all learned a lot in our time as travel therapists and believe that we have grown more as clinicians than we would have if we had taken permanent jobs right out of school and stayed at the same facility. There are opportunities for mentorship even as a traveler, and there are some big career growth opportunities for travelers that cannot be matched in a permanent position. Don’t let fears about potential lack of career development hold you back from a rewarding and fulfilling career as a traveler!

If you have any questions or would like help getting started on your travel therapy journey, then reach out to us in the comments below or through the contact us page!