Questions to Ask a Travel Therapy Company and Recruiter

Written by: Whitney Eakin, PT, DPT, ATC


So if you’re looking into travel therapy, by now you may have figured out that you need to contact travel companies and decide who you want to work with. In general, we recommend therapists work with at least two to three companies, in order to give themselves the most job options. It’s a great idea to talk to a few different ones at first to get an idea of which recruiters you like and which companies you like. Once you’ve found a few good ones, you’ll have them as your main contacts when it’s time to look for jobs.

Just to clarify, having two to three you’re working with doesn’t mean you’re an employee or locked in yet! You’re only locked in once you take a job with one company, and then you’re just locked in for that assignment. After that, you’re back to being a free agent and can mix and mingle with all your recruiters for the next job search.

But what should you be looking for in these companies and recruiters? What questions do you need to ask them to find out if they’re any good? Are there red flags to watch out for with recruiters? These are questions we hear from many therapists who are just getting started looking into the travel world. So let’s dive in and cover some of the things you should consider and some questions you should ask!

Recruiters

*Ok some of these aren’t actually “questions to ask” more just things to consider!

  • Do you like them?
    • Yep, this is important, you should like them and get along well, because you’ll be talking to them a lot and depending on them to help you.
  • Are they responsive?
    • Getting back to you quickly via calls, texts, and/or emails is important, especially when it’s crunch time and you’re searching for a job!
  • Can you reach them after hours/on weekends?
    • We have to respect the recruiters’ personal lives and encourage them to have a work-life balance, but sometimes things come up outside of business hours (since, of course, we work during business hours too) and on weekends. It’s nice to know whether you can reach them by cell phone in case of an urgent situation.
  • Are they trustworthy?
    • You have to feel this one out a little over time, gauge whether they’re being open and honest with you, or whether they’re holding back information and being shady.
  • How much experience do they have?
    • Ask how long they’ve been a recruiter and how long they’ve been with that company. This may or may not be a huge deal breaker, because they’ve all got to start somewhere. But gauge how long they’ve been in the business, and if they’re newer, how much training they got and who trained them.
  • How many travelers do they work with at one time?
    • This can vary from 15 to 50 or more. Ask them how many they usually work with, and what happens if they feel like their desk is getting too busy and they have too many travelers.
  • Do they work with a team?
    • Some companies work as a team of recruiters, but most work independently. But figuring out who else is in the office and who covers for your recruiter if he/she is out is a good thing to know. Also building a relationship with the recruiter’s manager might not be a bad idea in case your recruiter is ever out.

Companies

  • What states/areas do they cover?
    • Find out what states and areas they staff, and if there are certain areas where they tend to have more jobs. Most agencies staff nationwide, but sometimes they’ll have more connections in a particular area.
  • Do they work with only therapists or other healthcare professionals too?
    • Some companies do only therapy, while others staff everything from nursing to imaging technicians. Typically, they will have different departments for different professions, such as have a separate nursing division that isn’t involved with the therapy division. Just something good to know and understand who your company and especially your recruiter specializes in working with.
  • Are they considered a “small,” “medium,” or “large” company?
    • This just helps you understand what their overhead is like and how that might affect pay, as well as how their company runs and their job availability. For example, a bigger company may have more jobs but lower pay; a smaller company may have less jobs but higher pay. But it varies greatly!
  • What are their benefits like?
    • You’ll want to compare the benefits packages for each company. Here are some key things to look for:
      • Insurance: When does it start? Does it carry over between contracts? What company is it with? Do they have different tiers of coverage? How much is taken out weekly from your paycheck?
      • 401k: Do they offer it? Do they offer a match? When can you start contributing? When does the match start? When is the match “fully vested”? (meaning, if you leave the company after 1 or 2 contracts, do you keep the match, or do they take it back?)
      • PTO: Is there any opportunity to build PTO?
      • Others: Do they offer any additional perks, such as life insurance, disability, etc.
  • Do they offer reimbursements?
    • Some companies offer reimbursements for things like state licensing, CEUs, and travel to/from facilities. However, some companies have this just come directly out of your pay package for that particular contract, so you really end up with the exact same amount of money, just divided up differently. Whereas some companies have a different department and budget allocated for these reimbursements, so while it probably affects the company’s overall pay to all travelers, it does not directly affect your paycheck on an individual assignment. So if they say yes they will reimburse, ask where it’s coming from.
  • Do they offer CEU access?
    • Some companies instead of reimbursing you for CEU’s will give you online access to CEUs via a website where they have a subscription, so you can earn CEUs online for free while on contract with them.
  • What does an average pay package look like?
    • It’s important to find out what a normal range is that they see for your discipline. For example, they might say anywhere from $1500-1800/week. You might want to see how they break this pay down as well, including what numbers they use for hourly taxable pay (Ex: $20/hr) and how they break down your stipend/per diem money (Ex: hourly, or weekly). This is all a little more advanced, but you’ll learn as you go along and work with a few different recruiters and see how they break things down.
  • Do they offer a 40 hour guarantee?
    • This may depend on the company itself or the client they’re working with (the facility). Find out if they can secure a 40 hour guarantee for your contract, and if so, what does it cover? Does it include only if census is low, or does it also cover holidays and clinic closures due to inclement weather?
  • Where do their jobs come from?
    • Do they have a lot of direct clients, or do they mostly rely on Vendor Management Systems (VMS)? This is also a little advanced, but it’s good to understand where their jobs are coming from. All companies will have access to the jobs on the VMS systems usually, so companies that rely heavily on that will tend to have most of the same jobs.
  • Do they “cold call” if they’re having trouble finding jobs for you?
    • This is an important thing for them to be willing to do for you if they’re unable to find jobs in the particular area you’re looking for. “Cold calling” means they’re willing to call around to facilities in the area or ones they’ve worked with in the past, regardless of whether they have any job openings listed at that time. This puts them, and you, ahead of the game and can dig up some good job options that may not be posted yet.

These are some of the key things we feel it’s important to consider and ask when looking into travel companies and recruiters. Many companies will be similar in terms of jobs they offer and benefits, so sometimes your recruiter will make a big difference for you. You want to find a couple of recruiters you really like and trust, and build a good relationship with them. This will help you to have a great travel experience!

If you’d like to know the companies and recruiters we recommend, please reach out to us and we’d be happy to help you!


Whitney

Author: Whitney Eakin, Doctor of Physical Therapy, Certified Athletic Trainer, and Travel Physical Therapist since 2015

How to Find a Travel Therapy Company and Recruiter

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT

The Importance of a Good Recruiter and Company

Your position is only as good as your company, and your company is only as good as your recruiter. We never want to fight over money, we want at least acceptable benefits, and we want a company that stands behind their travelers. At the end of the day, we are the talent, and they should want to keep us on their team by treating us right.

Don’t Make the Same Mistake

The biggest mistake my fiancée and I made early in the process was requesting more information from Allied Travel Career’s website. The calls, texts, and emails still haven’t stopped years later. When we did find recruiters that we liked and trusted, they disappeared (sometimes mysteriously), got promoted, or changed companies. Recruiters are in the sales business, and sales is a field with very high turnover. You are going to want recruiters that are in it for the long haul, are honest, and actually listen to your wishes.

The company is important as well.  Preferably they take care of your recruiter and you throughout your career as a traveler. Glassdoor.com and indeed.com are good places to start that can provide you employee reviews on just about any company you can think of.

A Few Considerations in Choosing A Recruiter

  • How long have they been with the company?
  • How many travelers are on their caseload?
  • Do they respond quickly to your calls, texts, emails?
  • Does the recruiter seem honest and transparent with you, or are they being shady and withholding information?

A Few Considerations in Choosing a Company

  • Look at their benefits package and make sure it meets your needs
    • Are you eligible for 401k, and if so when? Do they offer a company match?  What is the vesting schedule?
    • When does insurance coverage start, day 1 or day 30?
  • See if they offer any bonuses such as travel reimbursements, referral bonuses, overtime bonuses, contract extension bonuses, etc.
  • Do they offer 40 hour guarantees for contracts?
  • Do they cover costs of licensing, credentialing, and continuing education?

Picking the Right Company and Recruiter for You

There is a lot to take into account when choosing the best travel therapy company and recruiter. We definitely recommend working with 2-3 companies at a time to give yourself the most options when searching for a travel contract.

If you don’t want to go through the process of combing through the hundreds of companies and thousands of recruiters yourself, send us a message and we will send you to our most trusted recruiters!

Interview Tips for Travel Therapy Jobs

Written by Travis Kemper, PT, DPT

Interview with the Facility

After you’ve been submitted for a job by your travel company, the next step is normally a phone interview with the facility (usually the Director of Rehab).

Interviews for travel jobs are a little different than permanent job interviews in my experience.  I don’t recall having anyone ask me real interview questions yet, they just want ot get a feel for who you are and make sure you would make a welcome addition to the team.  They also generally want to know a little about your past experience and qualifications.

Rarely am I ever asked normal interview questions, apart from “tell me about yourself.” Always be ready for that one in any interview.

What to Ask the Interviewer

Just as in a permanent job, you need to do a thorough interview of the company to make sure they are a good fit for you. Thirteen weeks is a relatively short time period, although it can feel very long if the position is wrong for you. Below is a list of questions my fiancée and I use in interviews. Obviously we tailor these to the specific facility, and we always try to research the facility a little bit if possible so we can glean any information that may be readily available online.

  • What are the productivity standards? How are non-billable tasks accounted for?
  • How much time do I have for an eval? Treatment?
  • What type of training/orientation provided?
  • What is the average caseload? # evals, # treatments
    • Ramp up period? What does this look like?
  • How many hours per week? Overtime?
  • What is the schedule? Weekends?  Holidays?
  • What does the team look like? # therapists, assistants, aides?
    • How many of each will I be supervising?
  • What is the general patient population? (Ortho, neuro, post op, etc.)
  • What is the average length of stay?
  • What is the facility size/number of beds?
  • What EMR do you use?
    • Will I have my own computer or tablet?
    • Is documentation performed at point of service or is time allotted for documentation?
    • Will someone be able to train me on the documentation system?
  • What is the dress code?
  • What is the director/supervisor’s profession?
  • Is there any mentorship available?
  • What equipment is available at the facility for therapy?

This is hardly an exhaustive list and needs to be tailored to every interview and facility, but we keep this list with us for every interview and it serves us well for keeping our thoughts organized.

 

We hope this list is helpful as you prepare for your travel therapy job interview! If you have any questions for us, please feel free to send us a message!